Ticket to Work Evaluation (January 2006)
Figures for Chapter III


Figure III.1: Sociodemographic Characteristics of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.1 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.
*Multiple responses are possible.

This bar graph shows the sociodemographic characteristics of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. Most TTW participants were similar to beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview, but they differed from all beneficiaries (usually by a wide margin) on characteristics such as age, race, gender, marital status, and education.


Figure III.2: Living Arrangements and Children of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.2 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.
Note: Own children defined as biological, adoptive, and/or foster care children of the respondent who are under age 18.

This bar graph shows the living arrangements of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; relative to all beneficiaries, a slightly higher percentage of TTW participants lives alone, while a slightly lower percentage lives with all or some of their own children.


Figure III.3: Age At onset of Limiting Health Condition(s) of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.3 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows age at onset of health condition(s) of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. TTW participants and beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview were much more likely to have been less than 18 years old at the time younger at their age of onset than the general beneficiary population.


Figure III.4: Condition(s) Causing Activity Limitation of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.4 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.
Note: Respondents could report multiple reasons for current activity limitations.

This bar graph shows the breakdown of condition(s) causing activity limitation of working-aged beneficiaries, by TTW and employment status; For all groups, the most common specific condition given was mental illness, selected by about a third of respondents (respondents could select more than one reason). Mental retardation was more common among beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview. The catch-all category "other" contains 63 percent of all beneficiaries and almost 50 percent of TTW participants or those employed at the time of the survey.


Figure III.5: Health Status of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.5 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows the health status of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; TTW and working beneficiaries were almost three times more likely to describe their health status "excellent" or "very good" than were all beneficiaries combined, while TTW and working beneficiaries were only half as likely to describe their health status as "poor" or "very poor" compared with the general beneficiary population.


Figure III.6: Number of ADL/IADL Difficulties of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.6 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows the number of ADL/IADL difficulties experienced by working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. Almost twice as many TTW participants and working beneficiaries said they had no functional difficulties, compared to the general beneficiary population.


Figure III.7: Prevalence of Difficulty Performing Specific Activities of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.7 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows the prevalence of difficulty among working-age beneficiaries in performing certain activities; in general, TTW and employed beneficiaries have less difficulty performing all activities than did the general beneficiary population. However, the more involved or physically vigorous the activity, the more likely that all three groups will have trouble with it.


Figure III.8: Body Mass Index of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.8 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows that body mass index of working-age beneficiaries who participate in TTW or who were working at the time of the survey does not differ substantially from the index for all beneficiaries.


Figure III.9: Current Health Compared with Last Year of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.9 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows the distribution of changes in general health status since last year for work-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; compared to the general beneficiary population, TTW and employed beneficiaries were more likely to say that their health was "much or somewhat better" and less likely to say it was "much or somewhat worse" than the general beneficiary population.


Figure III.10: Disability Program Status of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.10 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows the disability program status of working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status; compared to both all beneficiaries combined and employed beneficiaries, TTW beneficiaries are slightly less likely to be DI-only and slightly more likely to be in concurrent status.


Figure III.11: Health insurance Status at Interview of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.11 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows health insurance status of working-age beneficiaries, by TTW and employment status. Approximately 90 percent of beneficiaries in each group had Medicaid and/or Medicare. TTW participants were somewhat less likely to have private insurance than were employed beneficiaries or the general beneficiary population.


Figure III.12: Sources of Private Coverage Among Those with Private insurance of Working-Age Beneficiaries, by TTW and Employment Status

Figure 3.12 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows sources of private health coverage among working-age beneficiaries by TTW and employment status. Beneficiaries involved in TTW or who were employed at the time of interview are slightly more likely to have private insurance through their own employment and slightly less likely to have private insurance through their spouses.


Figure III.13: Heard of TTW or a Program Like TTW Among Working-Age Beneficiaries

Figure 3.13 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.
Note: TTW participants are defined as those participating in TTW at the time the survey sample was drawn. Only Phase 1 participants are included in the TTW participant sample for the first round of the survey.

This bar graph shows the percentage of working-age beneficiaries who had heard of TTW, or a program like it, by phase. Although about one-third of working-age beneficiaries in all three phases had heard of TTW or a program like it, a full 83% of Phase 1 Ticket participants had heard of TTW or a program like it.


Figure III.14: Employment Among Working Age Beneficiaries

Figure 3.14 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows employment among working-age beneficiaries; TTW participants were almost three times as likely as all working-age beneficiaries to be employed at the time of the interview. Beneficiaries who were employed at the time of the interview and TTW participants were far more likely than the other groups to be employed in 2003.


Figure III.15: Expectations About Future Employment

Figure 3.15 -- Please see caption below.

Source: 2004 National Beneficiary Survey.

This bar graph shows expectations about future employment, comparing SSI-only beneficiaries, DI-only beneficiaries, concurrent beneficiaries, TTW participants, beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview, and all beneficiaries. Beneficiaries employed at the time of the interview and TTW participants were more likely to have personal goals that include work/career advancement, to see themselves working for pay in the next year, and to see themselves working for pay in the next five years. TTW participants were slightly more likely than the other groups to see themselves working and earning enough to stop receiving disability benefits in the next year; TTW participants were also much more likely to see themselves earning enough to stop receiving benefits in the next five years.